Technology

Slack will soon start testing voice and video chat


TechCrunch / Josh Constine

Slack will soon start testing voice and video chat

 Slack is gunning for Skype and Google Hangouts with the 2016 product roadmap it revealed today. The biggest change coming: the ability to seamlessly turn a text chat into a voice or video chat will begin testing “very soon”. This builds on Slack’s January 2015 acquisition of Screenhero, when it said these features would eventually be released. At its customer conference in… Read More

Slack will soon start testing voice and video chat


TechCrunch / Josh Constine

Slack will soon start testing voice and video chat

 Slack is gunning for Skype and Google Hangouts with the 2016 product roadmap it revealed today. The biggest change coming: the ability to seamlessly turn a text chat into a voice or video chat will begin testing “very soon”. This builds on Slack’s January 2015 acquisition of Screenhero, when it said these features would eventually be released. At its customer conference in… Read More

Raspberry Pi 3 Launches — 50% Faster, With Wi-Fi, Bluetooth And An Eye On IoT


TechCrunch / Natasha Lomas

Raspberry Pi 3 Launches — 50% Faster, With Wi-Fi, Bluetooth And An Eye On IoT

 A major new Raspberry Pi microprocessor has been announced today: the Pi 3 Model B board becomes the new top-of-the-line Pi, with a 64bit 1.2GHz quad-core chipset and 1GB RAM it’s being slated to offer a 50 per cent power bump over the Pi 2. But is still priced at just $35… Read More

Raspberry Pi 3 Launches — 50% Faster, With Wi-Fi, Bluetooth And An Eye On IoT


TechCrunch / Natasha Lomas

Raspberry Pi 3 Launches — 50% Faster, With Wi-Fi, Bluetooth And An Eye On IoT

 A major new Raspberry Pi microprocessor has been announced today: the Pi 3 Model B board becomes the new top-of-the-line Pi, with a 64bit 1.2GHz quad-core chipset and 1GB RAM it’s being slated to offer a 50 per cent power bump over the Pi 2. But is still priced at just $35… Read More

Google unveils PlaNet neural network that outperforms humans at guessing the location of an image (MIT Technology Review)


Techmeme /

Google unveils PlaNet neural network that outperforms humans at guessing the location of an image (MIT Technology Review)

MIT Technology Review:
Google unveils PlaNet neural network that outperforms humans at guessing the location of an image  —  Google Unveils Neural Network with “Superhuman” Ability to Determine the Location of Almost Any Image  —  Guessing the location of a randomly chosen Street View image is hard, even for well-traveled humans.

Google unveils PlaNet neural network that outperforms humans at guessing the location of an image (MIT Technology Review)


Techmeme /

Google unveils PlaNet neural network that outperforms humans at guessing the location of an image (MIT Technology Review)

MIT Technology Review:
Google unveils PlaNet neural network that outperforms humans at guessing the location of an image  —  Google Unveils Neural Network with “Superhuman” Ability to Determine the Location of Almost Any Image  —  Guessing the location of a randomly chosen Street View image is hard, even for well-traveled humans.

Popcorn Time ‘Officially’ Announces Its Return


Gizmodo / Darren Orf

Popcorn Time ‘Officially’ Announces Its Return

Popcorn Time is the revolutionary app that’s been continuously dubbed the Netflix for torrents. But after aggressive legal action by the Motion Picture Association of America, the original site Popcorntime.io, shut down indefinitely. But after week of mystery surrounding its sudden reappearance, anonymous developers are declaring that illegal Netflix is back, baby.Previously reported by TorrentFreak, the Popcorn Time blog recently announced the resurrection with an update called “Hail Hydra.” The post says, “After the ‘MPAA incident,’ we’re a little diminished, and we’ve chosen a new direction: we’re shifting from an active development of Popcorn Time to a more or less resilience-driven development.”The unknown devs also mention other team members who’ve gone on to work on the legal version of Popcorn Time, called Butter, and say that Butter and their new zombie reincarnation share the same base code. As TorrentFreak points out, all these Popcorn Time imitators (there are several) along with various plug-ins must deal with the ever looming specter of insecurity, especially since anonymous developers mean no one can be held accountable if things go awry. This new incarnation of Popcorn Time says it’s sticking with the platform’s original mission, which means the site won’t be looking to make money whatsoever. Who knows how resistant this new form of Popcorn Time will be, but for now, streaming film is free again. [Popcorn Time Blog via TorrentFreak]Contact the author at darren.orf@gizmodo.com.

Popcorn Time ‘Officially’ Announces Its Return


Gizmodo / Darren Orf

Popcorn Time ‘Officially’ Announces Its Return

Popcorn Time is the revolutionary app that’s been continuously dubbed the Netflix for torrents. But after aggressive legal action by the Motion Picture Association of America, the original site Popcorntime.io, shut down indefinitely. But after week of mystery surrounding its sudden reappearance, anonymous developers are declaring that illegal Netflix is back, baby.Previously reported by TorrentFreak, the Popcorn Time blog recently announced the resurrection with an update called “Hail Hydra.” The post says, “After the ‘MPAA incident,’ we’re a little diminished, and we’ve chosen a new direction: we’re shifting from an active development of Popcorn Time to a more or less resilience-driven development.”The unknown devs also mention other team members who’ve gone on to work on the legal version of Popcorn Time, called Butter, and say that Butter and their new zombie reincarnation share the same base code. As TorrentFreak points out, all these Popcorn Time imitators (there are several) along with various plug-ins must deal with the ever looming specter of insecurity, especially since anonymous developers mean no one can be held accountable if things go awry. This new incarnation of Popcorn Time says it’s sticking with the platform’s original mission, which means the site won’t be looking to make money whatsoever. Who knows how resistant this new form of Popcorn Time will be, but for now, streaming film is free again. [Popcorn Time Blog via TorrentFreak]Contact the author at darren.orf@gizmodo.com.

Google’s New AI Can Tell Where Your Photo Was Taken Without Using Geotags


Gizmodo / Maddie Stone

Google’s New AI Can Tell Where Your Photo Was Taken Without Using Geotags

Image via Adam Bautz/FlickrIn case you didn’t already feel like Google was a creepy stalker, its artificial intelligence tools are rapidly crossing over into uncanny. The latest one is PlaNet, a new deep-learning machine that specializes in figuring out where a photo was taken—using nothing but the image’s pixels.Today, MIT Tech Review reports on a new effort led by Tobias Weyand, a computer vision specialist at Google, to create a computer that sees a photo and can instantly figure out where in the world it’s from. The system was fed over 90 million geotagged images across the planet, and trained to spot patterns based on location. In a trial run using 2.3 million geotagged images, PlaNet determined the country of origin with 28.4 percent accuracy and the continent of origin in 48 percent of cases. Now, those figures might not sound so impressive, but as MIT Tech Review points out, PlaNet is already performing quite a bit better than humans, whose squishy organic brains have a lifetime of ecological and cultural cues to draw on. And with more image training, PlaNet has the potential to get even better.“We think PlaNet has an advantage over humans because it has seen many more places than any human can ever visit and has learned subtle cues of different scenes that are even hard for a well-traveled human to distinguish,” Weyand told MIT Tech Review.If you’re a photography buff who sometimes forgets to geotag your images, tools like PlaNet could one day become your best friend. Then again, if you were already worried about Google watching your every move, it might be time to start avoiding cameras entirely.[MIT Tech Review]Contact the author at maddie.stone@gizmodo.com.

Google’s New AI Can Tell Where Your Photo Was Taken Without Using Geotags


Gizmodo / Maddie Stone

Google’s New AI Can Tell Where Your Photo Was Taken Without Using Geotags

Image via Adam Bautz/FlickrIn case you didn’t already feel like Google was a creepy stalker, its artificial intelligence tools are rapidly crossing over into uncanny. The latest one is PlaNet, a new deep-learning machine that specializes in figuring out where a photo was taken—using nothing but the image’s pixels.Today, MIT Tech Review reports on a new effort led by Tobias Weyand, a computer vision specialist at Google, to create a computer that sees a photo and can instantly figure out where in the world it’s from. The system was fed over 90 million geotagged images across the planet, and trained to spot patterns based on location. In a trial run using 2.3 million geotagged images, PlaNet determined the country of origin with 28.4 percent accuracy and the continent of origin in 48 percent of cases. Now, those figures might not sound so impressive, but as MIT Tech Review points out, PlaNet is already performing quite a bit better than humans, whose squishy organic brains have a lifetime of ecological and cultural cues to draw on. And with more image training, PlaNet has the potential to get even better.“We think PlaNet has an advantage over humans because it has seen many more places than any human can ever visit and has learned subtle cues of different scenes that are even hard for a well-traveled human to distinguish,” Weyand told MIT Tech Review.If you’re a photography buff who sometimes forgets to geotag your images, tools like PlaNet could one day become your best friend. Then again, if you were already worried about Google watching your every move, it might be time to start avoiding cameras entirely.[MIT Tech Review]Contact the author at maddie.stone@gizmodo.com.