Apple

Source: iPhone 7 will be similar in design to iPhone 6, but will have a flush rear camera, and no antenna bands on back (Eric Slivka/MacRumors)


Techmeme /

Source: iPhone 7 will be similar in design to iPhone 6, but will have a flush rear camera, and no antenna bands on back (Eric Slivka/MacRumors)

Eric Slivka / MacRumors:
Source: iPhone 7 will be similar in design to iPhone 6, but will have a flush rear camera, and no antenna bands on back  —  First Details on iPhone 7 Design: Flush Rear Camera, No Antenna Bands Across the Back  —  Apple’s iPhone 7 isn’t expected to launch until the usual September timeframe …

What’s Up With Uber’s New Logo? 


Gizmodo / Katharine Trendacosta

What’s Up With Uber’s New Logo? 

That’s Uber’s new logo which isn’t a stylized “u” anymore. Which is a weird choice that doesn’t seem at all connected with the name of the brand. Updated with more information and another logo. The new logo, along with quadcopter-like background, is already everywhere from App Store:To the official Uber twitter account:The old “U” one is still trademarked by Uber, but I bet we’ll be seeing a filing on the new one relatively soon. There’s no real reason for the change we can tell, other than maybe that Uber is trying to make itself over as a company. In which case, a weird disc with a square isn’t going to cut it. Updated: Wired has a piece on the new (and colorful) redesign. The logo we’re seeing everywhere is the “rider” one, with another “partner” one:The new logo, as one of the other writer’s here has pointed out, bears a bit of a resemblance to the logo for Chase. According to Wired, founder and CEO Travis Kalanick didn’t go to a marketing company for the rebranding (also called a “coming of age” story in Wired), but did it all in-house. Maybe if they had gone to someone else, they would have been told that a logo so totally divorced from a connection with the actual name of the company defeats the purpose of a trademark: easy identification. The new wordmark—the font and spacing of the company name—is actually great. It is much easier to read and still keeps some of the classic Uber look:The rest of the Wired story will fill you in on how Uber chose the new colors, picked the tessellated pattern after being inspired by bathroom tile, created mood boards, based the look on a blog post by Kalanick, and how they reworked the process once they figured out the problem was they were designing a logo for Kalanick and not the users. For my part, I’m going to go back to wondering why the line in the “rider” logo isn’t at least vertical, which would make it look slightly more like a “u.”Contact the author at katharine@io9.com.

Sources: Apple working on wireless charging tech for iOS devices that works over a distance, may be released as soon as next year (Tim Culpan/Bloomberg Business)


Techmeme /

Sources: Apple working on wireless charging tech for iOS devices that works over a distance, may be released as soon as next year (Tim Culpan/Bloomberg Business)

Tim Culpan / Bloomberg Business:
Sources: Apple working on wireless charging tech for iOS devices that works over a distance, may be released as soon as next year  —  Apple Said Developing Wireless-Charged Phone for as Soon as 2017  —  Technology could power devices further away than charging mats

iPhone Sales Have Finally Stalled


Gizmodo / Darren Orf

iPhone Sales Have Finally Stalled

It looks like interest in the iPhone is finally waning. For the first time since its creation in 2007, Apple is reporting a year-over-year dip in demand for its pricey pocket computer. That said, Apple still sold a lot of iPhones!http://gizmodo.com/holy-shit-appl…In a quarterly earnings call, Tim Cook just revealed that Apple has sold 74.77 million iPhones since September. That’s good news in a sense, since Apple really wanted to hit any number above 74.5 million iPhones sold, the ludicrous watermark established after sales of last year’s larger-than-usual iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus. But the increase in sales is almost insignificant. Tim Cook spent time comparing (smartly) how impressive the numbers are to iPhone sales two years and five years ago, but not last year because then he’d have to say the phrase “zero percent growth.” Other than that, Cook pins most of the blame on “weakening currencies in international markets” and a continuing lack of LTE penetration. Apple’s first ever iPhone sales plateau doesn’t necessarily mean it’s losing the title as reigning smartphone sales champion, but it does mean that Apple’s biggest source of revenue (about two-thirds, actually) might be stalling. Although that southward trending sales figure is a first for Apple, it certainly isn’t the first for most smartphone makers, who’ve been feeling a similar mobile sales plateau for at least a year aided in no small part by a slowing Chinese economy. iPhone sales in millions from reported numbers starting in January 2008.iPhones are also starting to have staying power, much like Apple’s iPad lineup. Early iPhones offered massive improvements over what came before—with some software even being upgraded into oblivion due to out-of-date processors. The iPhone 6s offered little more than the arguably useful 3D Touch and gimmick-filled Live Photos.The 6s did come with the faster A9 chip, but the Pew Research Center shows that the top five uses for smartphones are now text messaging, voice/video calling, internet, email, and social networking. You don’t really need blazing processors for any of those things. As the push for smartphone-powered VR continues, that could change, but until then a better processor doesn’t really mean much.Still, this number alone isn’t enough to declare that iPhone sales will forever be on the decline. When looking at the sales difference between iPhone 5 and 5s, you can see that the 5s only eked out a measly 3.2 million more than its predecessor. The 6s shows similar trends, though at an alarmingly smaller number.Apple’s answer to this less-than-stellar report seems to be “strength in numbers.” Rumors of three different iPhones for 2016, the iPhone 7, 7 Plus, and the much talked about 4-inch iPhone 5se, will most likely right the mobile ship, especially if Apple sticks with its bi-annual habit of reinventing the iPhone’s design. Some leaks already suggest as much.Contact the author at darren.orf@gizmodo.com.

It Cost Google $1 Billion to Keep its Search Bar on iPhones


Gizmodo / Chris Mills

It Cost Google $1 Billion to Keep its Search Bar on iPhones

Google’s search bar has been a fixture on Apple devices for years, something that’s always seemed counterintuitive, what with Android being iOS’s only real competitor. According to Bloomberg, Google’s search engine is only present because of a $1 billion payment made to Apple in 2014. Bloomberg found the details in court proceedings from an Oracle vs Google lawsuit. Oracle has been fighting Google since 2010 over the search giant’s use of Oracle’s Java software in the development of Android. Somewhere along the way, Oracle’s lawyers got their hands on internal Google finances, which were brought up in open court, before Google’s attorneys pleaded to have the transcript redacted and sealed. According to Oracle’s lawyers—and neither confirmed nor denied by Google’s side—Google paid Apple $1 billion in 2014 to keep its search bar on Apple devices. The two companies then have a revenue-sharing agreement to split any profits Google makes from Apple’s devices, although the breakdown is not known.Google search might seem like an iPhone staple, but it’s interesting to see what this implies—if Google suffers a lean year and doesn’t give more cash to Apple, you could be back to Yahoo search on your iDevices. In the same court case, Oracle also alleged that Google has made $22 billion in profit to date from the Android operating system. The company doesn’t break out Android-specific financials from its main business, but the documents claim revenue of $31 billion and profits of $22 billion. Given that revenue is solely from selling ads and apps, it’s a hefty figure, but still only equal to about half a year of selling iPhones. [Bloomberg]